In vRealize Operations Manager, you use alerts on a group to review the summary alert information for hosts and virtual machine descendant objects so that you can see how the state of one object type can affect the state of the other.

As a network operations center engineer, you are responsible for monitoring a group of hosts and virtual machines for the sales department. As part of your daily tasks, you check the state of the objects in the group to determine if there are any immediate problems or any upcoming problems based on generated alerts. To do this you start with your group of objects, particularly the host systems in the group, and review the information in the Summary tab.

In this example, the group includes the following object alerts.

Host has memory contention caused by a few virtual machines is a Health alert

Virtual Machine has chronic high memory workload is a Risk alert

Virtual Machine is demanding more CPU than the configured limit is a Risk alert

Virtual Machine has large disk snapshots is an Efficiency alert

The following method of evaluating alerts on the Summary tab is provided as an example for using vRealize Operations Manager and is not definitive. Your troubleshooting skills and your knowledge of the particulars of your environment determine which methods work for you.

Create a group that includes virtual machines and the hosts on which they run. For example, Sales Dept VMs and Hosts. For an example of how to create a similar group, see Create a Custom Accounting Department Group.

Review how the Summary tab works with object groups and related hierarchies. See Evaluating Object Summary Information.

1

In the left pane of vRealize Operations Manager, click the Environment icon.

2

In the center pane, click the Groups tab and click your Sales Dept VMs and Hosts group.

3

To view the alerts for a host and the associated child virtual machines, in the left pane, click Host System and click the host name in the lower left pane.

The Summary tab displays the Health, Risk, and Efficiency badges, the top alerts for the host. Because the group is still the focus, the alerts for the child virtual machines do not appear in the Top Alerts for Descendants widgets.

4

To view the Summary tab for the host so that you can also work with the child virtual machines, click the right arrow to the right of the host name in the lower left pane.

5

Select the vSphere Hosts and Clusters, located in the upper part of the left pane.

To work with alerts for child virtual machines, the host in the vSphere Hosts and Clusters hierarchy must be the focus of the Summary tab rather than the host as member of the object group.

6

To view the alert details for an alert in the Top Health Alert pane, click the Host has memory contention caused by a few virtual machines alert name.

When multiple objects are affected, and you click the alert link to view the details, the Health Issues dialog box appears. If there is only one object affected, the Alert Details Summary tab for the object is displayed.

7

On the Alert Details Summary tab, begin evaluating the recommendations and triggered symptoms.

A recommendation for this generated alert is to move some virtual machines with high memory workload from this host to a host with more available memory.

8

To return to the object Summary tab so that you can review alerts for any descendant virtual machines, click the back button located to the left of the left pane toolbar icons.

The host is again the focus of the object Summary tab. Generated alerts for the child virtual machines appear in one or more of the Top Alerts for Descendants panes.

9

Click on each virtual machine alert and evaluate the information provided on the Alert Details Summary tab.

Virtual Machine Alert

Evaluation

Virtual Machine has chronic high memory workload

The recommendation is to add more memory to this virtual machine.

If one or more virtual machines are experiencing high workload, this situation is probably contributing to the host memory contention alert. These virtual machines are candidates for moving to a host with more available memory. Moving the virtual machines can resolve the host memory contention alert and the virtual machine alert.

Virtual Machine is demanding more CPU than the configured limit

The recommendations include increasing or removing the CPU limits on this virtual machine.

If one or more virtual machines are demanding more CPU than is configured, and the host is experiencing memory contention, then you cannot add CPU resources to the virtual machine without further stressing the host. These virtual machines are candidates for moving to a host with more available memory. Moving the virtual machines would allow you to increase the CPU count and resolve the virtual machine alert, and might resolve the host memory contention alert.

10

Based on your evaluation, take action based on the child virtual machine recommendations.

After you take action, it will take a few collection cycles to determine if your actions resolved the virtual machine and host alerts.

After a few collection cycles, look again at your Sales VMs and Hosts group to determine if the alerts are canceled and no longer appear in the object Summary tab. If the alerts are still present, see User Scenario: Investigate the Root Cause of a Problem by Using the Troubleshooting Tab Options for an example troubleshooting workflow.